Weddings

4 American Wedding Traditions We Don’t Want to Die

January 5, 2017

2016 more than any year before, saw a huge backlash towards (previously) popular wedding traditions. While some traditions definitely deserved to be forgotten, it’d be a shame if we lost all of our traditions! Here are a few American wedding traditions that are seeing a decline in popularity, but should be kept alive:

1. The House Party

No, it’s not that kind of house party.

A house party is the friends and families who aren’t standing at the altar with you, but are still assigned to an important wedding function. These may be the people doing readings, speeches, and even those who are ushering in guests. It’s custom to include your house party in all of the same festivities as you would your bridal party, including lunches, showers, and even the bachelorette party.

The house party originated in the south (and more specifically, Texas). It is where the controversial concept of the honorary bridesmaid came from.

2. A Groom’s Cake

Groom’s cakes were originally a Victorian era English tradition that came over to the states and has lived on in the South. The tradition is simply that the groom gets to choose their own dessert and its decoration. His dessert is then served alongside the Bride’s cake (which is the larger wedding cake that most of us consider to be the wedding cake.”

The groom’s cake can be decorated in his favorite sports team’s colors or in a way that shows off his hobby or personality. He typically decides the flavor as well, and in the past, it was custom to lace the groom’s cake with alcohol. Now flavors are typically rich, unique flavors like peanut butter and chocolate.

3. Venetian Hour

The dessert bar is a popular fixture at today’s weddings, but few realize where this originated: the venetian hour. The venetian hour is like a dessert bar on steroids. It’s a massive assortment of desserts ranging from cookies to pies and even fancy desserts like bananas foster and more. It’s so large that many brides understandably choose to forego a wedding cake, however the venetian hour is typically served after the cake has been served and nobody will blame you for serving both!

If you couldn’t tell by the name, the Venetian hour originated in Italy, but was brought over to the U.S. by Italian Immigrants. Since, it’s become a cherished tradition in New York and New Jersey.

4. Homemade Cookie Table

Originating in Pittsburgh, the Cookie Table is a tradition that basically boils down to having a giant assortment of cookies at your wedding. Typically, family and close friends will make their family recipes for cookies and bring them to the wedding in the hundreds. This enables guests to try a wide variety of cookie recipes.

Now you don’t need to require all the cookies to be handmade, and a few could be bought, but remember the goal is to to have cookies which your guests have likely never tried so if you do go the store bought option, try to find a boutique cookie shop or bakery that sells some of your favorite cookies so that guests can still get a unique experience!

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